My GTAV character is looking suitably creepy

My GTAV character is looking suitably creepy

(Source: belyenochi, via hipposloveme)

HAPPY YORKSHIRE DAY

HAPPY YORKSHIRE DAY

hesitation-wound said: This is really sad, it’s the second time in a month I’ve heard of a person with CF passing away. I hope your keeping well man

Hey man, yeah it’s pretty shitty ain’t it?!

I’m good man, on paper I’m the best I’ve been in over a year so I can’t complain!

(Source: mysimpsonsblogisgreaterthanyours, via discount-transorbital-lobotomy)

RIP Jess

This morning a good CF friend of mine passed away. I’d known her for about 6 years, all in all I think. She was lucky to have a lung transplant (after being on the list for what seemed like a LONG time) about a year ago, but unfortunately due to rejection and other problems it finally got the better of her.

I first met her on the adult ward we both attend, obviously as CFers do we got talking online, but whenever we saw each other off the ward (say in the hospital lobby) we’d always stay for a chat. We met during a bit of a difficult part of my life, and she helped along by listening and talking. She always said I should have a reason to smile.

One time we were both on the ward as inpatients during my 26th birthday, she ordered my a (surprise) take away cheeseburger, which I thought was awesome. It’s the little things I guess.

We were both on the ward as inpatients a couple of weeks ago actually. I wish I popped my head around her door to say hello, I’d have gotten a bollocking for it off the staff, but who cares right? A bollocking to speak to a friend isn’t much, and I never did because I always thought I’d get another chance, this was a girl that kept dodging bullets, kept fighting; and always pulled through. Hindsight, eh?

RIP Jessjess. I’ll never forget you x

shastafirecracker:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

I knew this and this is why my mom and I have called doorways “lobotomy arches” for years

shastafirecracker:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

I knew this and this is why my mom and I have called doorways “lobotomy arches” for years

(via quantum-entropy)

the-actual-universe:

Say hi to PlutoNext summer, the New Horizons spacecraft will make a close flyby of Pluto, giving us our first look at an object in the Kuiper Belt.A few days ago, it turned its LORRI camera in the direction of its target and this image is the end result. The spacecraft remains over 400 million kilometers away from its target, but even at that distance this is very likely the highest-resolution image of Pluto (and its moon Charon) ever taken, and of course, things will only get better from here.-JBBImage credit: NASA/New Horizons[x]

the-actual-universe:

Say hi to Pluto

Next summer, the New Horizons spacecraft will make a close flyby of Pluto, giving us our first look at an object in the Kuiper Belt.

A few days ago, it turned its LORRI camera in the direction of its target and this image is the end result. The spacecraft remains over 400 million kilometers away from its target, but even at that distance this is very likely the highest-resolution image of Pluto (and its moon Charon) ever taken, and of course, things will only get better from here.

-JBB

Image credit: NASA/New Horizons
[x]

(Source: facebook.com)

mysocalledjinx said: kool book, fuck face. :)

brianmichaelbendis:

reblogging purely for truth of photo.

Fuck the main CF group on Facebook so much. Fuck it.